LBA Fails to Rush Elections; Congress, Elections Feb. 17 & 18

first_imgPerhaps the Liberia Basketball Federation is working against itself; for the second time, LNOC and Youth and Sports oficials have quashed the association’s rush elections set for February 6.The new dates are: Congress February 17, and Elections February 18. Information reaching the Daily Observer last night said, “Elections will go on after deliberations at the Congress are done.” It means that the elections’ date could be extended if the need arises, a source said.After a lengthy dialogue at the Ministry of Youth and Sports, and LNOC officials yesterday, LBF officials were made to see the reason they should not have a congress and an election the same day, as planned.“They were told that Congress is an assembly,” said an official who was at the meeting and asked not to be named, “and therefore properly, the administration must provide a four-year financial and administrative report to the body for discussion.”LNOC president Philibert Brown was reported to have put his foot on the ground, recommending for the Rufus Anderson’s administration, whose tenure expired last November, to provide one year financial and other administrative report for Congress’ deliberations.“The elections are long overdue,” he was quoted as saying, “and therefore to demand a four-year report might delay them.”Outgoing president Anderson was reported to have said, “I concur to what Mr. Brown has recommended.”“The administration has been mandated to provide the documents to all club presidents for their review on February 2,” according to sources at the association.He said, “I think it is victory for those of us who have seen major leadership problems in the administration of basketball in the last four years.”Having won the first round of their cause, club presidents are demanding that the Elections Commission must set guidelines that allow for any club president or owner who desires to run for the leadership.And perhaps this is where the problem is. The administration has reportedly observed potential candidates that could sweep victory election day, and therefore it has been influencing guidelines to deny others from running.“We are determined to correct this,” another club president told the Daily Observer.Another problem the Anderson administration has condoned is the use of double names for the association: According to its Constitution, it is: the Liberia Basketball Federation, a copy of which is with the Daily Observer but official communication has: Liberia Basketball Association.“That in itself is against the Constitution,” a club president said.A second copy of a document circulated by Secretary General D. Allen Goodridge about the now cancelled Feb. 6 elections named a three-member commissioners instead of an election commission.Those named are Mr. Jerome M, Hodge, chairman, with members Ms. Sussie Hayes and Mr. John P. Sheriff. “This was hurriedly done by the administration when many club presidents raised issues in the first circular of January 10,” he said.Youth and Sports and LNOC officials insisted that the proper thing to do, in line with its constitution and not those of the Federation of International Basketball Association (FIBA) is to use its own guidelines.“Mr. Brown told the outgoing administration to use its Constitutional provisions and not that of FIBA,” our source said.What then becomes the use of double names for the association?“Since the Constitution calls it LBF,” said another official, “why does Anderson’s administration refers to the body as LBF/LBA?”In the end club presidents who have said Anderson administration has outlived its usefulness will not relent until what one of them hopes must come to pass for the old administration happens.“We want basketball to take a new but positive course and we can achieve that only when we allow any owner and club president who desires to run in the forthcoming election do so without obstruction.” This is a challenge to Rufus Anderson’s re-election bid and as to whether he sees himself losing an election that his administration is determined to deprive others to run will be seen in the weeks to come.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Sharing Strategies for Integrating Maternal and Newborn Care: Strengthening the Continuum

first_imgPosted on May 27, 2015October 24, 2016By: Amy Boldosser-Boesch, Interim President and CEO, Family Care International; Mary Kinney, Specialist with Save the Children, Saving Newborn LivesClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The blog was cross-posted from an original post by HNN.Panelists give remarks at the Sharing Strategies for Integrating Maternal and Newborn Care: Strengthening the continuum side event in Geneva. Photo: PMNCHThe global health community gathered May 19 to recognize the importance of integrating maternal and newborn care and to celebrate the release of the Every Newborn Action Plan (ENAP) Progress Report May 2015 and Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM). The side session at the 68th World Health Assembly Integrating maternal and newborn care: Strengthening the continuum was standing room only as a panel of champions for integration of maternal and newborn health took the stage. Co-sponsored by the Governments of Malawi and Cameroon, this event was planned with the support of a wide range of partners.*Opening the event, Rajiv Bahl, Acting Director MCA, WHO, noted the how the unacceptable levels of maternal and newborn mortality and stillbirths impede the realization of healthy and sustainable societies. Yet 15 of the 18 countries, with the greatest burden of deaths and mortality rates, have taken concrete action. As moderator, Robin Gorna, Executive Director of the Partnership for Maternal Newborn & Child Health, underlined the importance of hearing from countries on success factors particularly through improving the quality and coverage of care through integrated strategies and programmes. She reflected on the synergies between these two strategies advancing efforts: ENAP discussed and endorsed at the World Health Assembly in 2014; and the EPMM launched this year at World Health Assembly.The Minister of Health of Cameroon, Mr. André Mama Fouda, the Minister of Health of Malawi Ms. Jean Kalilani and the Minister of Health of Peru Mr. Anibal Velásquez Valdivia spoke at the side event. Photo: PMNCHThree Ministers of Health shared perspectives on how implementation of the Every Newborn Action Plan together with maternal health interventions had improved health outcomes for mothers and babies in their countries. Cameroon’s Minister of Health, André Mama Fouda, noted that improving newborn health and preventing stillbirth is integrally linked to improving women’s health throughout the lifecourse. The Minister raised one of the key themes of the evening-the role of midwives in providing these essential, quality and integrated maternal and newborn health services. He noted he was happy and proud that new midwives were being trained in his country. Malawi’s Minister of Health, Jean Kalilani, highlighted efforts to increase access to family planning, reduce the age of marriage, and address cervical cancer as key strategies to reduce maternal mortality. These strategies will be linked to Malawi’s soon to be launched national Every Newborn Action Plan, developed in response to the government’s realization that Malawi was leading the world in pre-term births. Peru’s Minister of Health, Aníbal Velásquez Valdivia, discussed his country’s Comprehensive Health Insurance Scheme, which includes free access to basic health care for children younger than 5 years and for pregnant women, while giving priority to vulnerable populations living in extreme poverty.UNFPA, UNICEF and WHO representatives then shared how they are working across the continuum of care to strengthen care for women, newborns and children. Her Royal Highness Princess Sarah Zeid noted that over half of all maternal, newborn and child deaths occur in fragile and humanitarian settings, and the need for urgent action to provide quality care to women and babies in those settings. Calling for every birth to be counted, she also made a plea for greater attention to stillbirths and the enormous impact on women and communities. While panelists and audience members shared the specific perspectives from across governments, donors, healthcare professionals, advocates and youth, the core message was strikingly the same: health outcomes for mothers, their newborns and children are inextricably linked but strategies and programs to improve RMNCH are often planned, managed and delivered separately, and this must change. Kate Gilmore, Deputy Executive Director of UNFPA, called for an end to fragmented programs that separate the mother and child and challenged all in attendance to finally put women and children at the center of all development programs. Nina Schwalbe, Principal Adviser, Health, UNICEF, reminded us that we can’t take care of the child if we don’t take care of the mother.Kate Gilmore, Deputy Executive Director of UNFPA makes remarks during the side event. At right is Her Royal Highness Princess Sarah Zeid of Jordan. Photo: PMNCHConcluding the session, Marleen Temmerman, Director RHR, WHO, used photos of the reality on the ground as a sobering reminder that ending preventable maternal and newborn deaths and stillbirths requires action now by everyone, everywhere.As we prepare for the launch of the new Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents Health and the Sustainable Development Goals, there is an increased focus on reaching every woman, newborn, child and adolescent everywhere. The event, and the ENAP and EPMM strategies, demonstrate the importance of an integrated approach to improving quality services, a growing commitment to work and investment across the continuum of care, and propose complimentary targets to get us there. As a global health community success will rely on supporting an integrated approach in research, policies, health services, and advocacy for maternal and newborn survival — one that helps to finally put an end to the preventable deaths of women and their babies.*Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more