Wandering 4yearold boy struck by truck on freeway offramp

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News, Traffic & Accidents FacebookTwitter Updated: 7:10 PM KUSI Newsroom Posted: March 12, 2019 March 12, 2019center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – An overnight collision near a freeway in City Heights sent a four year old child to the hospital.On Tuesday morning, around midnight, the boy was struck by a truck while walking in the University Avenue off-ramp on southbound Interstate 15. The child was alone and without his parents.The California Highway Patrol said the driver of a Chevy Silverado saw him in the traffic lanes, tried to swerve but hit the child as he attempted to slow down. The boy survived, but sustained major injuries.One of the most puzzling aspects of the story is how did the child wind up at the freeway? San Diego Police said they have subsequently learned the identify of the four year old and his parents. The police department said it received a report of a missing child following the collision. Detectives who went to investigate then discovered the link to the boy’s parents.We asked other parents in the area what they thought of the odd circumstances. A parent of two named ManMan told us he could not understand how any responsible adult could lose track of their child. “How long does it take for you to notice that your kid’s not with you?” Another dad, Kevin Miranda said he would also question the actions of the parents. “There’s no excuse for that. To be honest, I guess the parents weren’t around. They were probably on drugs right, you know? Just for that little kid to be wandering off like that, (the) parents had no responsibility,” Miranda said.The injured boy remains at Rady Children’s Hospital. San Diego Police said the incident will be reviewed by the Child Abuse Unit to see if a crime was committed. KUSI Newsroom, Wandering 4-year-old boy struck by truck on freeway off-ramplast_img read more

OBITUARY Bernard J Kovitch 83

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Bernard J. Kovitch “Bernie” age 83, of Wilmington, MA, passed away on December 18, 2018, at the Mass. General Hospital in Boston, MA.Bernie was born on March 29, 1935, at home in Great Bend, PA; he was the dear son of the late Paul and Albina Kovitch. Bernie was the fifth of twelve siblings who were raised and educated in Hallstead, PA.Upon graduation from The Hallstead School, Bernie enlisted in the United States Air Force in 1953 where he proudly served in the Korean conflict. Following his completion of active duty, Bernie continued to serve his Country in the Air Force Reserves until March of 1967.Bernie married Ruth Walcott on June 2, 1956; the couple moved to Wilmington on November 1, 1958 where they raised their family.While in the AF Reserves, Bernie attended Bentley College studying accounting and working as a Purchasing Agent at Revere Sugar Refinery, Charlestown, MA for over 27 years; then as manager of parts procurement at Walcott Sales & Service for 20 years.Bernie will be fondly remembered for his passions; lobster, blueberry pie, football (no stat unknown to him), animal lover, expert campfire builder, and horseshoe champion.Bernie was the beloved husband of Ruth (Walcott) Kovitch, devoted father of Linda Kovitch of Bedford, Marcia Breakey & her husband Roger Breakey, Jr. of Nashua, NH, Jeffrey Kovitch of Phila, Ohio and his late son Larry Kovitch. Loving “Grampie” of Roger Breakey III, Kristen Breakey, Leah Kovitch and Lynn Kovitch. Cherished son of the late Paul and Albina (Sturek) Kovitch, dear brother of Irene McCarthy & her late husband John, Elinore Fitzgerald & her late husband John, Paul Kovitch, Jr. & his late wife Lillian and Andrew Kovitch & his late wife Genoa all of Hallstead, PA, Dorothy Dewey & her late husband William of Binghamton, NY, Edward Kovitch & his wife Jenny of LaVista, NE, Joseph Kovitch & his wife Olivia of Klamath Falls, OR, and Michael Kovitch of Harrisburg, PA. Bernie is survived by his Aunt, Alice Grasso of Binghamton, NY, Kenneth Walcott, Mesa, AZ and Priscilla Walcott and her late husband Philip of Reading, MA as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Bernie was predeceased by his brothers Steven and George Kovitch and his step-sister Margaret Kovitch-Clark, sister-in-law, Virginia Henderson, nephews Andrew Henderson, John Fitzgerald II, niece Jessica McEwen.Family and friends will gather at the Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 62), Wilmington, MA, on Saturday, January 12th for Visiting Hours from 11:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m. immediately followed by a Celebration of Life at 2:30 p.m.In lieu of flowers, donations in Bernie’s memory may be made to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, 1250 Fourth St., Suite 360, Santa Monica, CA 90401-1353 http://www.pfc.org or to the Wounded Warrior Project PO Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675-8517.Bernard J. Kovitch(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Retired Mass. State Trooper Ronald S. Bernard, 73In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: John “Jack” Tannian, Jr., 89In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: William J. “Bill” Wolfe, 75In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Will the US Break Up Big Tech Dont Hold Your Breath

first_imgFor a “let’s break up Big Tech” antitrust movement to happen, as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has proposed, “there would have to be a sea change first in how the antitrust enforcement agencies think about antitrust and then in how the courts think about it,” says Prof. Daniel A. Crane, senior professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School.Political pressure is building on U.S. regulators to do something, or at least make it look like they’re trying. The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission in the past few weeks have divvied up their oversight of Big Tech with potential antitrust probes in the offing, per multiple reports. The DOJ is looking into Google and Apple and the FTC is examining Facebook and Amazon, according to a Wall Street Journal report.The prospect of major regulatory action against tech companies spooked investors — shares of Alphabet, Google’s parent company, fell 6% on Monday — but tech stocks rebounded Tuesday amid a broader market uptick.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) joined the fray Monday in a pair of tweets, citing the House Judiciary’s launch of “a long overdue investigation to determine if dominant digital platforms have harmed Americans in the marketplace & the voting booth.” Her statements come a week after she lashed out at Facebook when the company refused to remove a doctored video.“Unwarranted, concentrated economic power in the hands of a few is dangerous to democracy — especially when digital platforms control content,” Pelosi wrote. “The era of self-regulation is over.”The question is what legal grounds the U.S. can use to rein in the big tech firms. Historically, antitrust law considers consumer harms in terms of pricing. But if, for example, Amazon or Facebook steal an idea from a competitor or acquire a startup before it can become a rival, “that doesn’t result in higher prices — it’s some future innovation harm,” says Hal Singer, fellow at George Washington Institute Public Policy. Going down the antitrust path could take up to a decade to reach a resolution, according to Singer. Steven Spielberg’s Apple Event Appearance Was a Slap at Netflix (Analysis) Related Congress might get there faster through legislation, akin to the Glass-Steagall provisions of the Banking Act of 1933, which forced banks to separate commercial and investment banking. Even so, it’s not clear that breaking up tech giants would actually work to fix the problem, for example, by requiring Facebook to spin off Instagram and WhatsApp or making Google divest YouTube, says Singer.“If you had five Baby Facebooks, they would still have an incentive to steal” or otherwise use their scale to thwart rivals, Singer says.It’s worth noting that two decades ago, the U.S. government filed an antitrust suit — joined by 20 states — against Microsoft, seeking to break it up. The complaint centered on the software giant’s bundling of Windows and Internet Explorer together. The DOJ won an initial ruling approving splitting Microsoft into two entities (an OS company and an applications company). But the D.C. Court of Appeals rejected the idea that Microsoft should be broken up as the remedy for anticompetitive behavior. The Justice Department later reached a settlement with Microsoft, which among other concessions agreed to share APIs with third parties.“Breakup remedies are radical and they frequently have unintended consequences,” says Prof. Herb Hovenkamp of the University of Pennsylvania and the Wharton School. “Judges aren’t good at breaking up companies.”For now, expect business as usual among the big technology companies, according to Wall Street analysts.For Google, the worst-case scenario of the U.S. antitrust probes would be a fine like the $5 billion penalty the European Commission imposed last year, according to Citigroup analyst Mark May. European regulators ruled that parts of agreements between Google and Android partners violated European law, including requiring manufacturers to pre-install the Google Search app and Chrome browser app as a condition for licensing Google’s Play Store app. Meanwhile, a U.S. antitrust case against Facebook is “even less clear than it is for Alphabet,” May added. Popular on Variety Massive iPhone Hack Compromised Thousands of Phones Saber-rattling from D.C. about curbing the power of tech titans Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple has gotten louder. The growing backlash against Silicon Valley giants, who are viewed as harming competitors and wielding inordinate power over a key sector of the economy, could become part of the conversation in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.But could that lead to the U.S. breaking up one or more of the tech companies? It’s a long shot. Even if government regulators decide they have credible grounds to pursue antitrust cases against Big Tech, it will be at least five years — perhaps longer — before anything concrete happens as they wind through the court system, according to legal experts and industry analysts.One of the issues is that current U.S. antitrust laws are geared around price harms to consumers, whereas the likes of Google and Facebook offer their services for free. That would likely require a new federal law (or new interpretation of existing law) to bar the type of anticompetitive behavior the major tech players have been accused of. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Any U.S. action against Google would come after “significant business practice scrutiny by the EU that has resulted in limited impact on Google’s ad business,” BofA Merrill Lynch analyst Justin Post wrote in a note Monday. He also pointed out that an FTC probe into Google ended in 2013 “without further action into whether Google used its dominant web search position to disadvantage rivals.”But the current political climate is somewhat different, Post acknowledged, and he believes that if the DOJ moves ahead against Google that “would likely embolden critics of Facebook, Amazon and other tech giants as well” heading into the 2020 election year.The chorus for the American government to “do something” about Big Tech has included Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes (who hasn’t worked at Facebook in over a decade) urging the U.S. government to find a way to break up the social giant to rein in its “unprecedented and un-American power.”It may be becoming fashionable to speak out against Big Tech. But for now, the idea that Facebook, Google, Apple or Amazon will be broken up remains just rhetoric.last_img read more

This 4Part Process Helps One Firm Vet Top Talent

first_img 2 min read Enroll Now for Free May 25, 2016 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now When firms like Google, Ideo, Airbnb and even Pfizer need a freelance Java expert or UX designer — and they need it, like, yesterday — they call Toptal. The $80 million company has developed a rigorous, four-part screening process: “We get thousands of applicants every month,” says cofounder and CEO Taso du Val, “and we take the top 3 percent.” Here’s how Toptal vets its freelancers.Hurdle One: Soft-Skills Screening“We have to screen for adulthood,” says cofounder and COO Breanden Beneschott. “You need to be able to work across the world and still get stuff done. So, do you have a certain energy level? Are you disciplined? If you’re one minute late to the call — literally 60 seconds late — it’s an automatic fail.” 26.4 percent of original applicants make it to the next round…Hurdle Two: Coding ChallengeApplicants are given 90 minutes to solve three coding problems. Even developers with decades of experience face-plant under the pressure. “And if there’s a hint of cheating, you’re never going to get into Toptal,” says Beneschott.7.4 percent of original applicants make it to the next round…Hurdle Three: Big-Brother-Style ExercisesToptal hopefuls have to share their screens so an evaluator can watch their every keystroke. This is as much about creativity and collaboration as speed and intellect, so candidates are encouraged to talk through their thought process. 3.6 percent of original applicants make it to the next round…Hurdle Four: Faux ProjectTest projects can take 30 or more hours to complete. “People at the very top are so much better than everybody else — they’re endlessly hungry, endlessly talented,” says Beneschott. “It’s hugely valuable to find them.” That’s how 3 percent of original applicants make it into Toptal.Check out more companies on the 2016 Brilliant 100 list.  This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. This story appears in the June 2016 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe »last_img read more