Tyndall AFB Update 1200 People Working to Recover Base House Spending Panel

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Critical infrastructure at Tyndall AFB is starting to come back on line, according to an update Col. Brian Laidlaw, commander of the 325th Fighter Wing, provided Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein and Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth Wright over the weekend. The base now has power and workers are testing “various circuits,” Laidlaw said. The wastewater treatment plant is fully operational. Of the 300 buildings that employees have inspected — out of 704 total — at least 37 percent are fixable. Laidlaw said 1,200 people have been brought in from across the Air Force to recover base infrastructure. “Their job is to save what they can and, from there, build the base that is needed,” reported 325th Fighter Wing Public Affairs. “If you would have asked me two weeks ago how many of our buildings we thought would be operational, I would not have told you 37 percent,” Laidlaw said. … Rep. Kay Granger (R-Texas), chair of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, last week said the committee is prepared to provide whatever assistance is required to support areas devastated by Hurricane Michael. “[Rep. Neal Dunn (R-Fla.)] has kept me updated on the situation on the ground, especially at Tyndall Air Force Base,” Granger said in a written statement. “I will be visiting Tyndall soon to see firsthand what is needed for the base and the community to fully recover,” she said. … It could cost $2.5 billion to rebuild Tyndall but the investment is justified, partially because of the installation’s proximity to the Gulf Test Range, which accommodates high-altitude supersonic air combat training, said David Deptula, a retired Air Force lieutenant general who now is dean of the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. “It makes sense to rebuild it,” Deptula told Defense News. “Other than its proximity to testing ranges, it makes sense for mission, economic and political purposes.” He dismissed the notion that the 325th Fighter Wing’s F-22 Raptors could be moved elsewhere. In July, the Government Accountability Office recommended DOD consider consolidating its F-22 fleet into larger squadrons or wings as a way to increase aircraft availability. Such a move would provide a larger pool of aircraft and spare parts to draw from in a contingency, GAO said.Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sean Carneslast_img read more

Its the last blue moon of the decade and you can totally

first_img Share your voice 1 Sci-Tech 12 Photos This is a full moon. A blue moon looks like a full moon. That’s it.  NASA/Kim Shiflett I’m all for an exciting “blood moon” (aka: a total lunar eclipse) or even a just slightly interesting “supermoon” when the full moon looks a smidge bigger in the sky, but there is absolutely no reason to get excited about this Saturday’s “blue moon.”You may have seen other headlines declaring that this will be the last time this unique full moon will rise until 2021, but there’s actually nothing astronomical that sets a blue moon apart from any other full moon. According to the Library of Congress, a blue moon occurs when a particular season has four full moons rather than the typical three. When this happens, the third moon of the four is labeled a blue moon. It has nothing to do with the actual coloration of our natural satellite, or anything to do with space, for that matter. It’s just one of the naming conventions from the old Farmers’ Almanacs: the same as calling January’s full moon a “wolf moon” because wolves were often heard howling at winter moons long ago, apparently.  That’s the most old school definition of a blue moon, a least. It’s also come to be defined as the second full moon that falls within the same calendar month. So if there’s a full moon on the first day of any month (except February), you’ll get a blue moon about four weeks later. Again, this newer definition really has nothing to do with the moon itself, which is just going about its normal orbiting business. Rather, a blue moon is dependent on the rather arbitrary calendar that we’ve all decided to use to keep track of our lives. So while blood moons aren’t actually bloody and supermoons are really more “kinda neat” than full-blown super, both are worth stepping outside to see. A blue moon, on the other hand, is really just the same as last month’s full moon. If you miss it, there’s a repeat showing four weeks later, just without the fancy title. center_img Super blood wolf moon lunar eclipse dazzles in striking photos Tags Comment Spacelast_img read more

Section 57 to return in new form

first_img.The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Act’s controversial Section 57, which is set to be revoked, will return in new forms in the proposed ‘Digital Security Act 2017’.In the face of widespread criticism from different quarters, the government has decided to abolish the Section 57, along with Sections 54, 55, 56 and 66 of the much talked about ICT law.But, the draft ‘Digital Security Act 2017’ has incorporated some provisions which are in the controversial ICT act’s Section 57.The final draft of the Digital Security Act 2017 received the nod at an inter-ministerial meeting at Bangladesh Secretariat on Wednesday. Officials engaged in drafting the law, said the draft will now be sent to the cabinet for approval and then to parliament to pass it as a law.Information minister Hasanul Haq Inu on Wednesday said the Digital Security Act could be passed in the next winter session of parliament.According to the proposed Digital Security Act, once the draft act will come into effect, the sections 54, 55, 56, and 57 of the ICT act will stand abolished.According to the ICT Section 57, “If any person deliberately publishes or transmits or causes to be published or transmitted on the website or in electronic form any material which is fake and obscene or its effect is such as to tend to deprave and corrupt persons who are likely, having regard to all relevant circumstances, to read, see or hear the matter contained or embodied in it, or causes to deteriorate or creates possibility to deteriorate law and order, prejudice the image of the state or person or causes to hurt or may hurt religious belief or instigates against any person or organisation, then this activity of his will be regarded as an offence.”For such an offence, according to the Section 57, the person can be jailed not more than 14 years or not less than 7 years and fined maximum Tk 10 million.The definition of the offences under the section 57, the non-bailable provision and punishment drew huge criticism and had made the act controversial.Following widespread misuse of Section 57, the police headquarters directed the police stations to seek permission from the higher authorities before booking any person in a case under the section.Also, the ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL) asked its activists to consult the party before suing any journalist under the section.Legal experts who’ve already gone through the draft of the Digital Security Act said the offences defined under ICT’s Section 57 have been incorporated in various sections with varied range of punishment in the new Act.Layer Jyotirmoy Barua told Prothom Alo that Section 57 is against human rights.“The government said that the Section 57 will be scrapped. If the provisions are kept in different forms in different sections of the new act, how can you say that the Section 57 is abolished?” said Jyotirmoy.According to the Section 27 of the draft act, if anyone or a group consciously publishes or transmits or helps do anything on website or in any other electronic form to hurt religious sentiment, the act will be considered a crime. The offenders will have to languish in jail for maximum five years or fined maximum Tk 1 million or both.If the person commits the crime for the second time or third, s/he will be jailed for 7 years and fined maximum Tk 2 million or both. The offence is non-bailable here as well.Asked about the matter, Supreme Court lawyer Shahdeen Malik told Prothom Alo that the law which calls ‘attack on sentiment’ a crime must be misused.“What hurts whom totally depends on a certain individual and that is prone to the misuse.”“If you really want to keep such provisions, there should be a provision that it must be reported to the magistrate first, instead of police. Once the magistrate is convinced, then he can refer it to the police,” he noted.While talking to newsmen, the law minister, Anisul Huq, however, claimed that Section 57 will not be retained in the digital security act.Those ‘checks and balances’ which are required to defend the freedom of speech will be preserved in the Digital Security Act as well as in the proposed Broadcast Act.Section 28 of the draft digital act says that if a person commits any crime on any website or in any other electronic platform under section 499 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC-1860), the person will face maximum two years of imprisonment or will be fined Tk 300,000 or both.If the person commits the crime for the second time or more, s/he will be imprisoned for maximum five years or fined Tk 1 million or both.Section 499 of the Penal Code reads, “Whoever by words either spoken or intended to be read, or by signs or by visible representations, makes or published any imputation concerning any person intending to harm, or knowing or having reason to believe that such imputation will harm, the reputation or such person, is said, except in the cases hereinafter excepted, to defame that person.”Whereas Section 30 of the digital security act says that if any person or group deliberately publishes or transmits on a website or in any other electronic platform any material which creates enmity and hatred among different sections or communities or hurts communal harmony, or creates instability or anarchy or the possibility of deterioration in law and order, the activity will be regarded as a crime.If the section is violated, the person will be jailed for maximum five years or fined Tk 500,000 or both.If the person commits the crime for the second time or more, s/he will be imprisoned for maximum seven years or fined Tk 1 million or both.Another section of the draft act reads that if anyone promotes any propaganda and transmits that or helps do that against Bangladesh’s freedom fight or sentiment of the Liberation War or Father of the Nation, the person will be sentenced to life term in jail or fined a maximum 10 million or both.Another section of the draft act says if any person sends or preserves any secret information by intruding into any government, semi-government, autonomous or constitutional body through computers, digital devices or digital networks or any electronic means, the activity will be regarded as a computer or digital espionage crime.For such a crime the person will be sent for maximum 14 years to jail or fined Tk 2.5 million or both.If anyone commits the offence for the second time or more, the punishment will be life imprisonment or a fine of maximum Tk 1 crore or both.Besides, if any person violates the law even staying abroad, the offence will be taken into cognisance as an offence committed at home.Information minister Hasanul Haq Inu said different terms of punishment have been proposed for different types of crimes in the draft Digital Security act.A debate continues over the Section 57 for a long time as a number of people have already been harassed under the section.Quoting statistics of the police headquarters, a Prothom Alo report on 2 August said as much as 42 cases were filed under the ICT act in January and the number of cases rose to 79 in June. A total of 391 cases were filed against 785 persons between January and June this year. Police have already arrested 313 of them. Most of the persons were sued under the Section 57.Dhaka University professor Asif Nazrul Islam was sued under Section 57 with a Madaripur police station by shipping minister Shahjahan Khan’s nephew. The professor, however, secured bail recently.  Dwelling on the digital security act, Asif Nazrul said as the definition of the offences mentioned in the act is not clear, the ruling party’s leaders and activists can easily file case against any person whenever they wish. The ICT act was enacted in 2006 and amended later in 2013, making it stricter.The government started drafting the Digital Security Act in 2015. At first, it was named as Cyber Security Act-2015 and it was renamed as Digital Security Act-2016.* This report, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Toriqul Islamlast_img read more

Deliver consular services 24 hrs FM asks head of missions

first_imgForeign minister AK Abdul Momen. File photoForeign minister AK Abdul Momen has directed all Bangladesh missions abroad to provide consular services for its citizens round the clock, reports UNB.He has already written a letter outlining necessary measures to all the heads of missions abroad with much focus on building stronger relations with Bangladeshi expatriates.In the letter, he directed the mission heads to keep the consular services line open for 24 hours with immediate effect, said the foreign ministry on Thursday.The foreign minister said it is urgent to improve consular services making it friendly for Bangladeshi expatriates through bringing necessary changes.He said the flow of investment and remittance into Bangladesh will increase if the Bangladeshi expatriates can be involved in Bangladesh’s overall development process.The desired success depends on friendly relations with expatriates with required services in place, said the foreign minister.He also directed them to make a database on expatriates as per their professions.last_img read more

Four charged over Panama Papers scam

first_imgThe US government announced charges Tuesday against four men it said laundered money and arranged tax avoidance schemes through the Panama firm at the centre of the “Panama Papers” scandal.The four were affiliated with Mossack Fonseca, the law firm that helped thousands of clients around the world move money offshore to protect it from taxes.Named in the 11-count indictment were Ramses Owens, 50, Dirk Brauer, 54; Richard Gaffey, and Harald Joachim Von Der Goltz, 81.Owens is a Panamanian attorney who worked for Mossack Fonseca. Brauer, a German national, was an investment manager for Mossfon Asset Management, which was closely affiliated to Mossack Fonseca, the Justice Department said.Both were accused of marketing, creating and managing anonymously-owned shell companies on behalf of clients seeking to conceal assets from US tax authorities.Gaffey was a US accountant who allegedly helped Americans set up accounts with Mossack Fonseca, and Von Der Goltz, a German national who lived in the United States, was assisted by Gaffey and Owens in setting up offshore shell companies to hide assets, according to the charges.Prosecutors said Brauer was arrested in Paris on 15 November, Van Der Goltz was arrested in London on Monday, and Gaffey was arrested in Boston Tuesday.Owens remains at large.Mossack Fonseca’s operation was exposed in 2016 by reporters coordinated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, which went through 11.5 million leaked files to discover that scores of world leaders, sports and entertainment stars and dozens of billionaires used the firm to hide their wealth.It implicated Iceland’s Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson and his wife; banks, companies and aides close to Russian President Vladimir Putin; families of Chinese President Xi Jinping and former British prime minister David Cameron; Middle East royals, and other international figures.”As alleged, these defendants went to extraordinary lengths to circumvent US tax laws in order to maintain their wealth and the wealth of their clients,” said Manhattan US Attorney Geoffrey Berman.”Now, their international tax scheme is over, and these defendants face years in prison for their crimes.”Last Thursday, German prosecutors raided Deutsche bank offices in Frankfurt in an probe of money laundering and tax evasion also linked to the revelations of the Panama Papers expose.last_img read more

US Restricts Electronic Devices On Flights From 8 Muslim Countries

first_img Share Kamran Jebreili/APEmirates passenger planes are parked at their gates at the Dubai International Airport in the United Arab Emirates. The U.S. is imposing new restrictions that require most electronic devices, including laptops, tablets and cameras, to be placed in checked baggage on direct flights to the U.S. from eight mostly Muslim countries, including the UAE. Passengers can still carry smartphones.Airline passengers coming to the U.S. on direct flights from eight majority-Muslim nations can still carry smartphones into the cabin of the planes, but must now place larger electronic devices, like laptops and cameras, in checked baggage under stepped-up security measures, U.S. officials said.The measures announced Tuesday morning cover about 50 incoming flights a day from the eight countries — Jordan, Egypt, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates.All are traditional U.S. allies and none is among the six majority-Muslim nations on President Trump’s controversial executive order that seeks to temporarily suspend immigration. The president issued a revised executive order on March 6, and this one, like the original in January, has been blocked by the courts.The six countries cited in Trump’s order all have fraught relations with the U.S., and several are plagued by unrest or civil war, including Syria, Libya and Yemen.In contrast, the countries on the new airline list are mostly stable, have generally good relations with the U.S., and include four wealthy states in the Gulf.The U.S. officials said the airplane restrictions are based on intelligence indicating that terror groups are still plotting to blow up civilian planes. The officials stress that the latest measure is not related to the president’s executive order, but it’s certain to draw comparisons amid the ongoing political and legal battle over Trump’s immigration order.Royal Jordanian informs passengersRoyal Jordanian Airline announced the security steps on Twitter on Monday afternoon. The tweet was deleted shortly afterward, but it prompted administration officials to speak to reporters and announce the planned move.U.S. authorities have expressed concerns in the past that explosives could be placed inside electronic devices.However, the administration officials declined to say specifically why they thought this move would enhance security since it doesn’t ban electronic items currently permitted on planes, it just requires that they be placed into checked baggage.Passengers can still take smartphones or essential medical devices into the cabin. But larger items, including laptops, tablets, cameras, DVD players and electronic games will have to be checked, the U.S. officials said.The officials cited attacks in recent years by extremists, including the downing of a Russian charter plane in Egypt in 2015, which was apparently caused by an explosive device on the aircraft. The officials also noted airport attacks carried out by gunmen in Brussels and Istanbul in 2016.U.S. carriers are not affected because none travels directly to the U.S. from airports in the eight named countries.American officials said they started reaching out on Sunday to make sure the countries and airlines knew these new regulations were coming.For the past several years, U.S. authorities have expressed great concerns about the bombmaking skills of the al-Qaida satellite in Yemen, and have cited group member Ibrahim al-Asiri in particular.Yemen is on Trump’s immigration ban, but there are no direct flights from that country to the U.S. However, Yemen is relatively close to the four Gulf states that are on the airline list.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Google introduces its Public Data Explorer

first_img The application is called the Public Data Explorer, and is built on the visualization technology Google obtained in 2007 when it acquired Trendalyzer. The same technology powers Google’s Chart Tools, which can be used to easily add graphs and charts to web pages.Google statistician Jürgen Schwärzler, said the Public Data Explorer allows users to “mash up” data using different kind of graphs, charts and maps. Once a chart is prepared it is dynamic, and changes can easily be made, such as altering the scale or highlighting entries. The application makes it simple to embed the chart on a web page or blog, or share it with friends. It cannot be downloaded or exported yet, but Google is working on options to allow both.The Google Public Data Explorer website allows users to play with the application, to select the data set and create animated visualizations that change over time. A number of examples already created demonstrate how the tool works. They include fertility rates in selected regions of the world, increase in per capita income in various counties of California, and rising unemployment in the US.Unemployment in the U.S.The Public Data Explorer is an extension of Google’s aim to add visual data such as charts to searches. Early last year, charts originating from the US census and the US Bureau of Labor Statistics were added to relevant search results. Then in November indicators derived from the World Bank were added. The new application adds a further five sources: the US Bureau of Economic Analysis, Eurostat, the US Center for Disease Control, the California Department of Education, and the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD).The Public Data Explorer is at the experimental stage and was launched on March 8 in order for Google to gather feedback from users. A similar tool is already available for the Microsoft search engine, Bing.google</a>.com/publicdata/explore/embed?ds=d5bncppjof8f9_&ctype=b&met_x=sp_dyn_le00_in&scale_x=lin&ind_x=false&met_y=sp_dyn_tfrt_in&scale_y=lin&ind_y=false&met_s=sp_pop_totl&scale_s=lin&ind_s=false&dimp_c=country:region&ifdim=country&hl=en_US&dl=en_US”>This chart correlates life expectancy and number of children per woman for most economies of the world. More information: www.google.com/publicdata/home Citation: Google introduces its Public Data Explorer (2010, March 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-google-explorer.html Google routes World Bank data to fact seekers (PhysOrg.com) — Google’s latest release is an application that allows users to create their own interactive, animated graphs and charts using public data such as census data or government statistics on unemployment or mortality rates. The charts and graphs created can then be embedded into web pagescenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more