This 4Part Process Helps One Firm Vet Top Talent

first_img 2 min read Enroll Now for Free May 25, 2016 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now When firms like Google, Ideo, Airbnb and even Pfizer need a freelance Java expert or UX designer — and they need it, like, yesterday — they call Toptal. The $80 million company has developed a rigorous, four-part screening process: “We get thousands of applicants every month,” says cofounder and CEO Taso du Val, “and we take the top 3 percent.” Here’s how Toptal vets its freelancers.Hurdle One: Soft-Skills Screening“We have to screen for adulthood,” says cofounder and COO Breanden Beneschott. “You need to be able to work across the world and still get stuff done. So, do you have a certain energy level? Are you disciplined? If you’re one minute late to the call — literally 60 seconds late — it’s an automatic fail.” 26.4 percent of original applicants make it to the next round…Hurdle Two: Coding ChallengeApplicants are given 90 minutes to solve three coding problems. Even developers with decades of experience face-plant under the pressure. “And if there’s a hint of cheating, you’re never going to get into Toptal,” says Beneschott.7.4 percent of original applicants make it to the next round…Hurdle Three: Big-Brother-Style ExercisesToptal hopefuls have to share their screens so an evaluator can watch their every keystroke. This is as much about creativity and collaboration as speed and intellect, so candidates are encouraged to talk through their thought process. 3.6 percent of original applicants make it to the next round…Hurdle Four: Faux ProjectTest projects can take 30 or more hours to complete. “People at the very top are so much better than everybody else — they’re endlessly hungry, endlessly talented,” says Beneschott. “It’s hugely valuable to find them.” That’s how 3 percent of original applicants make it into Toptal.Check out more companies on the 2016 Brilliant 100 list.  This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. This story appears in the June 2016 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe »last_img read more

This Flying Vehicle Could One Day Be Your Uber

first_img With every passing year, we grow more disappointed by the fact that science fiction hasn’t come true, and we still aren’t riding around in flying cars. But maybe it’s time to re-evaluate what a flying car would actually look like.German startup Volocopter (formerly E-Volo) has been developing drone-like VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) vehicles for the better part of a decade, and this week at CES, the electric-powered Volocopter 200VC took its first autonomous flight in North America at CES in Las Vegas. During Intel CEO Brian Krzanich’s keynote address, Volocopter CEO Florian Reuter joined him onstage to announce a partnership between the two companies and kick off the flight demonstration. Related: Check Out the Coolest Cars and Concept Vehicles at CES 2018Last year, automotive corporation Daimler invested $30 million in Volocopter after a succesful test flight in Dubai and the launch of an autonomous air taxi testing program with the city. The partnership with Intel serves to bolster Volocopter’s safety and data processing.Volocopter is not the only air taxi at CES. Workhorse Group is also showcasing its SureFly “octocopter” at the show, and Bell Helicopter unveiled an “air taxi” in partnership with Uber.Volocopter flying in front of a huge audience on the stage of @ParkTheaterLV during the @intel keynote here at #CES 2018! #futurenow #allin #volocopter pic.twitter.com/spJKDVPw0m— Volocopter (@volocopter) January 9, 2018Krzanich himself flew in a more advanced model of the Volocopter, the 2X, in Munich, Germany, last month. Watch his ride in the video below.  Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals January 10, 2018 2 min readcenter_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more